Eric Andre’s Bad Trip<\/em> Was Filmed Back When Road Trips Were Still A Thing

Eric Andre’s new hidden camera/prank-based comedy Bad Trip is a lot of things at once. First off, well, it’s just funny. The movie follows a Borat or Bad Grandpa format of mixing real-world hidden camera pranks—and unsuspecting marks—with an actual narrative storyline that remains consistent from start to finish. It’s also set in a world that’s undoubtedly, decidedly, not the world that any of us have been familiar with since March 2020; people aren’t wearing masks, social distancing, or otherwise concerned about Covid-19. And that’s because the movie was filmed long before its 2021 release date.

The movie, which stars Andre alongside Lil Rel Howery (Get Out) and Tiffany Haddish (Girls Trip), puts its stars right into the world with real people doing real things looking for real reactions. It’s a plan that involves a closeness with strangers that likely looks foreign for most watching the movie, as a year of quarantine, social distancing, and health protocols has naturally shifted what we all think of as a “new normal.”

But since MH spoke with Andre about the making of the movie, he also let us know about when the movie was actually filmed, and the road it took to make it to your living room on Netflix.

When was Bad Trip actually filmed?

Andre tells Men’s Health that filming for Bad Trip actually took place between October 2017 and December 2018. That’s a longer than usual gap between filming and release, but the movie ended up shifting its release a few times due to extenuating circumstances, and, eventually, Covid-19, before landing at Netflix.

“We finished editing in April 2019, and then we were going to come out in the fall of 2019, and there was a conflicting movie, so we pushed to 2020,” Andre explained. “And then we got into SXSW, a killer timeslot at SXSW, one of the headliners. And then we were going to premiere worldwide in theaters everywhere in April, and have SXSW be like the sneak peak kickoff. And then the world went to shit and collapsed.”

Andre is glad the movie landed on Netflix eventually, though, as he notes the streaming giant’s massive reach. Netflix has 200 million subscribers worldwide, and the movie is now available with subtitles and dubs in 60 languages.

“Hundreds of millions of people will have access to the movie in a way that we wouldn’t have been able to do in the studio system,” he says. “So we lucked out in that way.”

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