Paris Hilton Confronts the Artist Who Photoshopped 'Stop Being Poor' Shirt

Paris Hilton‘s fashion was all many people could talk about in the 2000s. Now, one of her most infamous looks is seeing a resurgence. Hilton recently shared a TikTok video explaining how an artist photoshopped the “Stop Being Poor” shirt — not the paparazzi. Then, the heiress invited the artist who edited the image onto her podcast to settle the rumors. 

Paris Hilton outfits made headlines when she wore the ‘Stop Being Poor’ shirt 

Hilton was a hot commodity in the early 2000s, thanks to her celebrity status, The Simple Life, and friendships with “It-Girls” like Britney Spears and Lindsay Lohan. Contrary to the persona she created, Hilton isn’t really the way she came off in those days. 

“I’m not a dumb blonde, I’m just very good at pretending to be someone else,” the heiress explained to Vanity Fair. “I built a shell. I always knew exactly what I was doing.” You go, Glen Coco! 

Despite Hilton’s control over her public persona, she couldn’t prevent the public’s disgust when photos of her seemingly wearing a “Stop Being Poor” shirt started to circulate. Hilton has her arms raised and smiling in the photo, but the image caused public backlash.

Hilton’s alleged lack of intelligence already put most people off. But when the public saw her wearing that shirt, the general opinion of Hilton declined even more. 

Paris Hilton’s TikTok video debunks the #STOPBEINGPOOR myth 

Now, Hilton is coming clean about the infamous shirt. Ironically, Hilton’s shirt didn’t say anything about being poor at all. 

The podcast host uploaded a TikTok on May 3 to explain what her shirt actually said. “So there’s this photo online of me,” she starts. “I’m sure you’ve seen it. I never wore that shirt.” 

Shockingly, the paparazzi didn’t photoshop Hilton’s “Stop Being Poor” shirt. “Everyone thinks it’s real,” she adds. “But that’s not the truth. This is what it really said: ‘Stop Being Desperate.’ Don’t believe everything you read.”

At the time of publication, Hilton’s TikTok explanation has more than 7.5 million views. 

Paris Hilton faces artist who photoshopped ‘Stop Being Poor’ image

During the “Pictures Don’t Tell the Whole Story” episode of the This is Paris podcast, Hilton opened up even more about the “Stop Being Poor” shirt. “I definitely had a moment of insecurity where I didn’t want people to think I would wear that shirt,” Hilton says. “Some people already had this perception of me that wasn’t always positive, so this shirt just added to that stereotype that people judge me to be.” 

Then, something completely shocking happens. Hilton is working with Blake Kathryn on creating her own Non-fungible token (NFT). Kathryn’s friend is an artist named Jubilee, who is responsible for photoshopping the “Stop Being Poor” shirt.  

Jubilee joins the show to speak with Hilton, who enjoys the artist’s work. During their talk, Hilton asks Jubliee about the public’s reaction to the photo.

“It was mostly people just laughing at it, but then people started taking it seriously and I was like, ‘Oh, Oh no,’” said the artist. “I didn’t think anyone would actually believe it was a real shirt.”

“I had no idea it was a girl artist just having fun,” Hilton adds. In reality, Jubilee edited the photo as a joke. 

And as if this story can’t get even more ironic, the day Hilton shared her TikTok was the same date Jubilee shared the photo in 2013. “It was eight years to the day that I posted that meme, like exactly,” Jubilee says. “I had originally posted it on like May 2nd or 3rd, 2013.” 

Artist apologizes to Paris Hilton for ‘stress’ photoshop edit caused

While Hilton finds humor in Jubilee’s edit, she still wanted to clear the air for the “haters” who are mean about the shirt. “I definitely never meant any ill will or anything like that,” Jubilee concludes. “I’m sorry it caused you stress because you thought it was the paparazzi.” 

Hilton forgives Jubilee, calling what she did “innocent.” She encourages Jubliee, who she considers a friend, to “keep killing it with [her] art.” 

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