Family home in port in Daphne Du Maurier novel on sale for £2m

Own your own Frenchman’s Creek: Family home in port immortalised in Daphne Du Maurier’s novel goes on the market for £2million

  • The Foreshore in Port Navas is in the setting of Frenchman’s Creek by Du Maurier
  • The property has direct access to the water via a slipway and running mooring 
  • Its terrace looks over Britain’s best sailing waters with stunning panoramic view

A rare opportunity has arisen for literature fans and boating enthusiasts to own a family home in a port immortalised in Daphne Du Maurier’s novel Frenchman’s Creek – which has gone on the market for £2million.  

The Foreshore is on the banks of Port Navas, the creek that leads to the famous Helford River in Cornwall.

Boating enthusiasts will want to get their hands on this idyllic family home – as it sits right on the shore of Britain’s best sailing waters. 

The property is on the market with estate agents Lillicrap Chilcott for £2million. 

The Foreshore is on the banks of Port Navas, the creek that leads to the famous Helford River in Cornwall

The four-bedroom detached house even comes with a slipway and running mooring so a future owner can directly access the water

The four-bedroom detached house even comes with a slipway and running mooring so a future owner can directly access the water.

It has panoramic southerly-facing views, a sea view and a delightful creekside setting.  

Who was Daphne Du Maurier? 

Dame Daphne Du Maurier was born in 1907 and died in 1989. She was an English novelist, biographer and playwright. She spent much of her life in Cornwall, which forms a backdrop for most of her writing.    

Du Maurier wrote dark and gothic novels, often with unexpected twists. Earlier, her works were seen as romantic. 

Her most famous work is Rebecca (1938), which tells the story of an unnamed narrator who marries widower Max de Winter. She moves with him to his mansion in Cornwall, Manderley, but the characters and the home are haunted by the memory of his first wife, the eponymous Rebecca. The novel is also famous for its first line: ‘Last night, I dreamt I went to Manderley again.’

Other significant works include Jamaica Inn, Frenchman’s Creek, My Cousin Rachel and The House on the Strand.  

Daphne du Maurier was an English novelist, biographer and playwright

The waterway is incredibly popular with sailors and is where Sir Ben Ainslie learnt his maritime skills.

It was also immortalised by author Daphne Du Maurier in her 1941 novel Frenchman’s Creek. 

Visitors can walk around the Creek via a National Trust path. 

It is believed to be one of only a handful of properties that own the foreshore in front of it down to the ‘mean low water’ line.

The property has retained much of its charm from when it was built in the 1930s and has a southerly aspect.

The house has 1,649 square feet of accommodation with an entrance hall, kitchen, sitting room, dining room, sunroom, three bedrooms, and two bathrooms on the ground floor and a fourth bedroom with en suite shower room on the lower ground floor.

Outside it has a broad level terrace, a gently sloping lawn and a flight of steps leading to the water.

The Helford River is internationally renowned for its sailing opportunities and Port Navas is one of the most sought after areas in Cornwall, renowned for its scenic beauty.

The village of Port Navas is also very attractive and in an area of outstanding natural beauty.

Tom Powell, from Lillicrap Chilcott, who are handling the sale, said: ‘The one thing everybody wants in this part of the county is direct access to the Helford River.

‘They are some of the best sailing waters in the country and it really doesn’t get much better.

‘This house has a gently sloping lawn and then steps down to a slipway and you’re into the river. It is a tidal creek, and you can sail from there for around three hours either side of high tide.

‘And with it being tidal you get the wading birds and wildlife on the riverbed when the tide is out and you can watch the sailors, kayakers and paddleboarders at high tide.

‘The property faces south across the creek, so you are in the sunshine for much of the day and you’re overlooking your garden, the creek and beautiful ancient wooded banks beyond.

‘There’s probably only about a dozen homes that have that direct access to this side of the creek and they don’t come up for sale very often. They’re generational homes that get passed down.

‘It’s that old saying location, location, location and this has it in buckets.

Boating enthusiasts will want to get their hands on this idyllic family home – as it sits right on the shore of Britain’s best sailing waters

The house has 1,649 square feet of accommodation with an entrance hall, kitchen, sitting room, dining room, sunroom, three bedrooms, and two bathrooms on the ground floor

Outside it has a broad level terrace, a gently sloping lawn and a flight of steps leading to the water

‘People go to the Helford River area for that marine lifestyle and here you’ve got it at the bottom of your garden.’

The novel Frenchman’s Creek tells the thrilling story of English lady, Dona, who falls in love with a French pirate. 

Du Maurier wrote dark and gothic novels, often with unexpected twists – and which are seen by some as romances. 

What happens in Frenchman’s Creek? 

Frenchman’s Creek (1941) is set in Cornwall in the reign of King Charles II. 

It tells the story of a love affair between English lady, Dona and a French pirate called Jean-Benoit Aubery. 

Dona falls in love with Aubery after she visits her husband’s remote estate in Cornwall, which is being used by the pirate as he has been terrorising the coast. 

Dona, who is quite impulsive, dresses up as a boy to join the pirates on an expedition. News of the attack brings her husband Harry back to Cornwall, who tries to capture Aubery. 

The real Frenchman’s Creek in Helford was made famous by the Du Maurier novel. Visitors can walk along it via a National Trust path. 

Frenchman’s Creek tells the story of a love affair between English lady, Dona and a French pirate called Jean-Benoit Aubery

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