I'm a flight attendant and there is a reason we sometimes ignore you on a plane

A FLIGHT attendant has revealed why they sometimes ignore you on a flight – and won't even serve you even if you ask.

Called deadheading, it means you could see a member of the crew in their uniform who isn't able to help you.

According to Betty Thesky, who has written about her experiences as a flight attendant in her memoir "Betty in the sky with a suitcase," she explained that deadheading means they are officially off-duty.

While they may still be in their uniform, they are not in service and so aren't officially working.

Betty explained how crew members are often on the plane if they are flying to their home base or flying to another airport for another flight.

She wrote: "Often, we’re still in our uniforms, but we’re not on duty. This drives some people nuts.

"If you see a flight attendant reading a magazine and sipping a drink or taking a snooze, they’re not being lazy – they are just deadheading."

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Patrick Smith, author of Cockpit Confidential and website Ask The Pilot, suggested the flight attendant should still be on duty in some situations.

He explained how it was "not the same as commuting to work or engaging in personal travel".

Instead, they are on an "on-duty assignment" still and were simply "re-positioning".

This means that while they would not be obligated to help serve and assist passengers, they would still be required to help in an onboard emergency.

It's not the only secret phrase that flight attendants use.

One flight attendant revealed how you can tell if they fancy you.

There is even a phrase they use for passengers they think are hot.

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